Island Arts Festival with Patrick Landeza & Halau Makana

Feb
1
2013

8:00 pm

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2513 Blanding Ave, Alameda, CA 94501, USA



Island Arts Festival with Patrick Landeza & Halau Makana

Rhythmix Island Arts Festival
Music and Dance of Polynesia

Featuring Patrick Landeza & Halau Makana
JUST ADDED!  Special Guest Artist: Bill Griffin

 

When:  Friday, February 1, 2013

Where: Rhythmix Cultural Works,

2513 Blanding Avenue, Alameda

Time:    8:00- 10:00pm

Cost:    $15 advance
$20 at the door
$12 students/seniors

Buy tickets

Tickets & Info: www.rhythmix.org

All Ages Welcome

Patrick Landeza is considered a leading exponent of ki ho’alu, the Hawaiian slack key guitar style, developed in the 19th century by Hawaiian cowboys who loosened their guitar strings “slacking” them for a lower, more resonant sound. As an award-winning musician, composer, and producer, born and raised in “the island Berkeley” to Hawaii-born parents, he became the youngest recipient of the prestigious Kapalakiko Aloha Spirit award, when he was 34. Today, Patrick is regarded as one of the top slack key performers, and is the Bay Area’s own slack key master.

His 2010 release, “Ku`u Honua Mele,” received the 2010 Hawaii Music Award in the slack key category, and was nominated for a Na Hoku Hanohano award (Hawaiian music's equivalent to the Grammy). His 2011 release Kama`alua was also nominated for a Na Hoku Hanohano award. Patrick is the first mainland artist to make it on the final ballot of Na Hokus. In January 2012, he performed at Carnegie Hall in Listen for Life's "Power of Eight" concert, which promoted peace through music.

Special Guest Artist: Veteran musician, album producer, and luthier Bill Griffin has been playing mandolin with the progressive bluegrass band The Cache Valley Drifters since the early 1970s. He started collaborating with folk
music icon Kate Wolf in 1974, producing, arranging, and playing on several of her albums including "Poet's Heart," for which he won an Indie award for folk music album of the year in 1986. Griffin developed a love for Hawaiian music early in his musical career, which prompted him to invent the mandolele, or nylon-stringed mandolin, so that he could achieve a mandolin sound that is amenable to Hawaiian music. After living in Hawai`i for several years, he moved back to California in 2012, where he continues to perform, record, and make mandoleles.

Hālau Makana is the only Polynesian Dance Company located in Alameda and the ensemble, performs dances from Hawai‘i, Tahiti and New Zealand. Kumu Lani founded the Halau as part of Island Hawaiian Studios to be a place to learn Polynesian music, art and dance. Born and raised in Hilo, Hawaii, Kumu Lani has been teaching Hula, Ori Tahiti and Maori for over 20 years. The studio’s primary mission is to preserve the Hawaiian, Tahitian, Samoan and Maori cultures through dance, art and music, and to share these art forms with the community. 

This concert made possible with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Zellerbach Family Foundation.